habitat

The Role of Science in The Trump Era

 The Role of Science in The Trump Era

This week the Electoral College confirmed Donald Trump as our next president. The election of a demagogue profoundly threatens our nation’s ability to produce sound science. And it creates a particularly pressing problem because of the many things Trump’s election isn’t changing—such as how nature works, and our human fundamental needs for survival.

In Extinction’s Way: The Wolverine and Climate Change

In Extinction’s Way: The Wolverine and Climate Change

Then there was the radio-tagged young male wolverine who a few years back summited the highest mountain in Glacier National Park, ascending the last 4,900 feet up a sheer, nearly vertical ice rampart in less than 90 minutes.

TEK and the Return of Wolves, Fire, and Bison

TEK and the Return of Wolves, Fire, and Bison

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is the wisdom indigenous and local people acquire by living on the earth. Rooted in a specific landscape and based on the fact that everything is connected, TEK braids together relationships between plants, animals, the earth, the seasons, and people.

Cougar Lessons in Coexistence

 Cougar Lessons in Coexistence

A growing North American cougar population has inspired scientists to take a close look at the risk this species presents to humans. In his 2011 analysis of 343 North American aggressive cougar encounters, David Mattson found that only 29 resulted in fatal human attacks.

Are Large Carnivores Doomed by Climate Change?

 Are Large Carnivores Doomed by Climate Change?

he world is getting warmer, creating an extinction threat for many species. According to NASA, since 1880 the Earth’s global temperature has risen by nearly one degree Celsius.

Recovery of the Great Bear?

 Recovery of the Great Bear?

As was the case for other large carnivores in the lower 48 United States, by the 1960s grizzly bears were nearly extinct. This species had dropped to less than 2 percent of its former range south of Canada and occurred in six small, discrete populations, totaling 800-1,000 individuals.